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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 3, 2009 12:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

Well, the love and death threads went on to such lengths that I think no thread has much of a chance of catching them, but here's to your sentiment!

I saw them from 74 til 82, and heard one SF concert from the car in 67, but completely dropped out from 82 til recently (05 or so with this place).

I value them primarily for two things: the music, which of course I love more than most any other (ie, in the way I can listen to CREAM or TalkHeads or WhStripes, but a bit moreso). And, second, the lyrics, ie, Hunter. That is what brings them to the fore for me, and always has. That is why Early Era is my focus, as I think all or at least many of great lyrics and songs to match were crafted from 68 to 70, with AmBeauty and Workman's being the highlights (I concede that a few gems were remaining to come out in the early to mid 70s, but you get my point).

Those lyrics really resonated and still do...as Earl, LiA, Rob and others commented on in the Love and Death threads, all manner of analysis and comment on "life" were expressed beautifully by Hunter and the boys, and that is what really does it for me in terms of my love affair with the DEAD. And then, as elb notes, it might also be because it's a great way to meet nice girls like Miss D.

This post was modified by William Tell on 2009-10-03 19:56:32

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Oct 5, 2009 7:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

I've got to agree with the Hunter comment - the lyrics are a big part of the Grateful Dead

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Poster: boltman Date: Oct 5, 2009 8:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

Echo your rationale for loving the Dead, but started a bit early (probably makes me older). Live Dead did it for me...lived in the Bay Area and got to catch some shows in San Francisco (70-72) before moving to San Diego where I would see them whenever they came to town. Last show was '84 in OC. Continued to listen, but found the IA in '05 (ish) and "rediscovered" the concert experience.

It is the incredible combination of the music and Hunter's lyrics (Barlow as well) that make it amazing. There are times of transcendence that are hard to find anywhere else except in GD concerts, times when everything just goes away and I am lost in the experience. That's what keeps me coming back and back, searching for those moments.

While I prefer early Dead (probably because it is when I first "got on the bus") I am stretching through the 70's and even trying some 80's. However, 68 - 73 just seems to do it for me more often.

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Poster: hippie64 Date: Oct 3, 2009 1:42pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

American Beauty hooked me and never let go. I love the 68 era I was listening to febuary 68 show today and was suprised to hear Lerry mention the passing of Cassady. I had no idea it was so early in 68 that he left us. WT, do you know of a book (besides on the road) that can shed more light on his life? Does anybody ?

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Oct 3, 2009 3:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

There's a 2006 biography of him called "Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero" by David Sandison, and his wife Carolyn wrote her memoirs under the title "Off the Road" (1990). Your local public library will get them for you for free, or you could probably find secondhand copies at www.abebooks.com

In both books he comes across primarily as an emotionally immature and self-indulgent egotist who was most interested in getting high and hitting on the nearest attractive woman. There must have been more to him that doesn't come across in books, since he acquired the reputation of a mystic American avatar full of crazy wisdom. Among the wonderful people who admired him,or even loved him, were not just Jerry and Bob (who was his roomate for awhile at 710 Haight St) but also Allen Ginsberg and Ken Kesey.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Oct 3, 2009 3:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

A true connundrum was Neal. I met him once when I was a kid and he kind of scared the heck out of me. But all things considered, he was loved and respected by them that we do...

If that makes any sense, could you 'splain it to me???

This post was modified by cush212 on 2009-10-03 22:35:33

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Poster: headgdhead Date: Oct 6, 2009 6:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

"emotionally immature and self-indulgent egotist who was most interested in getting high and hitting on the nearest attractive woman"

That pretty much sums up the 60's as I remember them.

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Poster: snori Date: Oct 4, 2009 5:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

More than 30 years after I read 'On the Road' I read Carolyn Casady's book. Then I read OTR again, and saw it in a completely different light. OK I was a teenager the first time, but things like leaving your wife with a new baby to hitchhike across the country to see some jazz definitely did not seem quite so cool as it had earlier. It remains a fantastic piece of writing, and captures the effervescence of the experience, but it's not a Life Manual.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 4, 2009 3:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

Yep; context does alter the story line, doesn't it?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 3, 2009 9:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Strangers stopping strangers just to shake their hand

Good summary D!

Yeah, along with Cush, I don't "get" him the way those that experienced him do...comes across as creepy and terribly self indulgent, but I suppose we all are, eh?


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